Amy Ewing writes YA novel that screams girl power

If you’re 20 years old, chances are you feel lost in the world world. You’re in a rush to get older, but you’re also still, admittedly, a kid. Combine that with thoughts on your love life and you’ve got an emotional human being crawling through life. Author Amy Ewing was one of them (or should I say, one of us).

When Amy was in her 20s, she went through a boy-crazy phase, which is quite the opposite of what she is right now. Her books, the Lone Ciy trilogy, are all focused on women and the power that we hold. She writes openly about the struggles of being a woman, and how there’s no template on how to be one.

The Jewel, the first book in the series, introduces us to Violet – a young teen forced into being a special kind of servant to the Royals. She was trained to be (somehow) a surrogate, and bought at a price. As she enters a life filled with riches and unexpected cruelty, she learns how to think on her own, stand up for what she believes is right, and falls in love along the way.

“You can’t just tell people, women especially, what to do with their bodies. They have the right to live in it the way they want to. I don’t want to force anyone to follow my beliefs, but instead I want them to think. I want them to feel for the character they’re learning to love, and when they notice an event in their lives that’s similar to the characters and they’re not happy with it – I want them to think and stand up.”

She came up with the trilogy when she was watching Liam Neeson’s Taken. “I know it’s weird, but there’s a scene in the movie where the daughter was getting paraded and bidded on by old wealthy men. That was it for me. That scene became (transformed into a significant part of the book.) I twisted the scene and thought why not make it women buying women. With that thought alone, I created the world of Violet.”

But her trilogy isn’t your typical Young Adult novel filled with romance and rebellion. It was a book that touched on a woman’s reproductive health and the issues that come with it. Hidden beneath the pages of Violet’s adventure are important points about a taboo subject. “I feel very strongly over everyone’s right to the ownership of their body. That’s a fundamental right,” Amy says.

Thriller inspo: Amy Ewing was inspired by Taken to write the trilogy.

As she explains this, the tone in her voice changes. It becomes softer but also more confident. It was the day after the U.S. elections, and she is admittedly devastated with the result. “America is backtracking like never before.  I can’t believe we’ve elected a man who would legislate the complete opposite of what people are fighting for.”


Amy is a woman who knows of women –– both friends and strangers –– and their struggle when it comes to their bodies. And it’s a similarity she shares with Violet. “You can’t just tell people, women especially, what to do with their bodies. They have the right to live in it the way they want to. I don’t want to force anyone to follow my beliefs, but instead I want them to think. I want them to feel for the character they’re learning to love, and when they notice an event in their lives that’s similar to the characters and they’re not happy with it – I want them to think and stand up.”

Now that she’s officially closed Violet’s arc, Amy will continue writing fantasy. “I know my brain is such a strange place. But I’m always going to keep writing about females and female dominance. The women in The Jewel are a wide range of characters, and I’m going to continue to question why we’re always delegated to be just one thing. Oh, that and also flipping the male persona.”

As for the boys she went crazy for in her twenties: “Oh they’re all terrible! I was a crazy twenty year old, and I wouldn’t hang out with myself then! (laughs) I like being in my thirties.”

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#books #gender #literature

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