Roberto Seña sets sail in a new sonic playground as St. Vincent and the Grenadines

Photo by Ralph Mendoza

Named after an obscure island nation floating off the eastern border of the Caribbean Sea, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, the side project of She’s Only Sixteen’s frontman Roberto Seña, is, in many ways, an attempt at exploration. Mapping out the soundscape, as it were. SVATG is one act in Logiclub’s roster of sonic cartographers, an act that has met with praise and celebration in bars and clubs all over the city.

But Seña doesn’t view this pet project as pure work. SVATG is playtime, both in process and performance, and we listeners are asked to join in the revelry, cups in the air, feet on the floor, mind on the music. So we at Young STAR decided to have fun with our questions.

YOUNG STAR: How did SVATG first start out?

RS: SVATG is a solo project of me trying to learn the art of production. There was no genre in mind but it was more of me exploring the art of making sound come to life. I explored many styles of making music but lately I’ve been making psychedelic ‘80s pop.

What are some differences between making music as SVATG and making music as the frontman of She’s Only Sixteen?

I have more freedom with SVATG because no one can tell me off. It’s apples and oranges, though. Nothing like a group of four guys constructing a brainchild in a small room. SVATG is musical masturbation.

What’s the difference between writing your own music and producing other acts?

You put yourself in the shoes of the artist when you produce. But you’re wearing better shoes. What I mean is you draw a line on what the artist wants to convey and how their music should sound like. You’re building an identity with an entity that isn’t yours so you can’t just drown the other act or artist in your own personal taste.

What are your thoughts, generally, on the electronic music scene?

It is booming with a fork in the road. Some of it sucks, some of it doesn’t. As with all genres of music.

What has been your favorite experience so far, performing as SVATG?

I love doing DJ sets because I play deep house and soul and disco. It’s nice to see people actually move and dance instead of just “turning up.”

What are your future plans?

An album for both projects. Major events from Logiclub. I’ve been managing acts. And I’ve been back to right. The future is always bright.

What’s the difference between writing your own music and producing other acts?

You put yourself in the shoes of the artist when you produce. But you’re wearing better shoes. What I mean is you draw a line on what the artist wants to convey and how their music should sound like.

You’re building an identity with an entity that isn’t yours so you can’t just drown the other act or artist in your own personal taste.

What are your thoughts, generally, on the electronic music scene?

It is booming with a fork in the road. Some of it sucks, some of it doesn’t. As with all genres of music.

What has been your favorite experience so far, performing as SVATG?

I love doing DJ sets because I play deep house and soul and disco. It’s nice to see people actually move and dance instead of just “turning up.”

What are your future plans?

An album for both projects. Major events from Logiclub. I’ve been managing acts. And I’ve been back to right. The future is always bright.

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#music

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