The YS Year-End Haul 2017

We say this about every year gone by, but we’ll say it again for posterity: smell ya’ later, 2017. While 2016 was the year of big, horrible decisions, 2017 saw us living out their consequences.

As a final hurrah for the year that was, we picked the seven most important things we learned and compiled them here, Youtuber-haul style.

Twitter threads are important parts of modern discourse if used wisely.

There is power in numbers. And by numbers, we mean multiple 140-character tweets strung together to be tools for intelligent discourse. Thanks to the magic of retweets and quote RTs, Twitter threads were able to do so much that web articles couldn’t they were immediate, usually informative, sometimes hilarious, and always controversial. Some of our favorites include Alex Tizon’s The Atlantic cover story threads, the Dear David thread (is that still going on?), all the meet-cute threads (see: Fully Booked girl and LRT girl), and the local indie music scene call-out threads.  

Ironically, it was also the year that we learned the art of responsible wokeness and agreeing to disagree as a result of putting all these views on display. Here’s to hoping we keep spreading the discourse, but we leave the petiness behind for good.   

Facebook is good for dogs and ulam; Twitter is good for awareness, fangirling, and memes.

While that ulam group, along with the pauso terms “lodi” and “petmalu” can go die in a ditch, we have to thank the Who’s Your Pupper, Senpai? Facebook group for shining light in these otherwise dark times. +100 boops for you guys.

On a related note, we don’t know if it’s just us, but people are more open about the thirst, a flame partially stoked by Charli XCX’s Boys MV and stan Twitter. In case you need more substantial data: some of the most clicked and shared Young STAR stories of the year involved boys and eye candy.

Words can change the world, but they don’t mean much without action and understanding.   

On the bright side, it’s awesome that more awareness was raised regarding sexual harassment, mental health, and HIV both online and IRL. We may not be at the point where we’ve #EndedtheStigma just yet, but we’re getting there. Words can only do so much, after all. If there was anything we learned from the Harvey Weinstein scandal, it’s that inciting change can start when we speak out and stop supporting those who are part of the problem. And always, always check your privilege before lending your ears to the plight of others from different backgrounds.

Fundamental rights don’t matter to a lot of Filipino politicians.

Nothing new here, dudes. While we’ve always known that our government kind of sucks at… governing, this was the year that our generation witnessed the katangahan (or, possibly, the vindictiveness) firsthand. Even without considering all the EJKs, think of all the motions and bills that got through the House of Representatives — the measly P1,000 budget for the Commission on Human Rights, the passage of the death penalty, and the extension of martial law in Mindanao.

Self-care is >>>

Self-care was a Priority in 2017. Just look at how everyone’s elaborate skincare routines and workout/diet regimens are no longer signs of vanity, but of good health.

Even the most seemingly untouchable faves can be problematic. Be wary.

The idea is one that’s been introduced to us ever since the great Taylor Swift Snake Day of 2016, but it was the call-outs of the Harvey Weinstein scandal that really opened the floodgates. This year, we’ve had to cancel people like Kevin Spacey and J.K. Rowling, and locally, Jensen and the Flips and Sud. These instances served as wake-up calls. To problematic faves: make your apologies sincere.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Augmented Reality (AR) are taking over the world.

The time has come that we’re only steps away from living in a world like I, Robot and Ex Machina. To be honest, we’re not sure if we should be scared or proud of technological innovation. Let this tweet help you decide:  

Tags:
#culture #politics

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